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  • People Were Locked Up To Perish In Plague Houses on Random Things About Edinburgh's Bloody History

    (#13) People Were Locked Up To Perish In Plague Houses

    Edinburgh survived many outbreaks of plague - even the deadly 1645 outbreak, which wiped out up to half the city's population. The city desperately tried to stop the spread of disease, issuing a quarantine for infected people. But that was just the start: On some streets, city officials took even more drastic measures.

    In several areas, the city simply bricked up the homes of people suspected of carrying the plague. The victims were left inside to perish with no way of escaping. Just like the residents of Mary King's Close, the people who met their ends behind brick walls in Edinburgh have inspired their own eerie ghost stories. 

  • A Headless Drummer Boy Haunts Edinburgh Castle on Random Things About Edinburgh's Bloody History

    (#6) A Headless Drummer Boy Haunts Edinburgh Castle

    In addition to a ghost bagpiper, Edinburgh Castle is also home to a ghost drummer with a striking appearance: He's headless. According to legend, the headless drummer first appeared in 1650, when Oliver Cromwell invaded Scotland and eventually captured the castle after a long siege. The apparition reportedly warned people of the castle's fall. For centuries, the drummer appeared when the castle was in danger. 

    As for the ghost's identity or how he lost his head, no one knows.

  • Infamous Bodysnatchers William Burke And William Hare Hunted In Edinburgh on Random Things About Edinburgh's Bloody History

    (#11) Infamous Bodysnatchers William Burke And William Hare Hunted In Edinburgh

    William Burke and William Hare turned bloodshed into a profitable business in 19th-century Edinburgh. The two got a taste of riches in 1827 when they sold the cadaver of a man who perished in Hare's boarding house from natural causes. The scheme quickly spiraled into a bloody spree, as the men began slaying the poor and elderly and poor. 

    Burke and Hare invited unsuspecting guests into the boarding house, offered them whiskey, and quickly suffocated them. Then they sold the cadavers to Edinburgh University. When they were caught, Hare turned on Burke, who received a capital sentence. After Burke was dissected, his skin was used to make a book. 

  • Edinburgh Has A Friendly Ghost Dog on Random Things About Edinburgh's Bloody History

    (#8) Edinburgh Has A Friendly Ghost Dog

    Not all of Edinburgh's ghost stories are scary. In fact, the story of Greyfriars Bobby is downright heartwarming. Greyfriars Bobby was a Skye terrier who has since been memorialized in a bronze statue outside Greyfriars Kirkyard. According to legend, Greyfriars Bobby was a loyal dog who visited his master's grave for 14 years. After his long vigil, Greyfriars Bobby was buried near his owner's grave.

    Today, the loyal dog lends his name to a Scottish pub. He's also remembered in a children's book that claims the ghost of Greyfriars Bobby still walks the Kirkyard. 

  • The Eerie Vaults Under Edinburgh Are Full Of Ghost Stories on Random Things About Edinburgh's Bloody History

    (#12) The Eerie Vaults Under Edinburgh Are Full Of Ghost Stories

    Hidden deep under the streets of Edinburgh, the South Bridge Vaults were home to social outcasts and dangerous crooks. The vaults were built in the 1700s as a series of chambers found within the South Bridge. The chambers became an underground city for smugglers and other lowlifes. 

    Brothels flourished within the hidden vaults, and bloodshed was common. Bodysnatchers William Burke and William Hare hid cadavers in the vaults, and the notorious duo also hunted for victims in the underground city, where missing people went unnoticed. Today, ghost tours bring visitors to the vaults to learn more about the area's eerie history. 

    In 2003, a BBC reporter interviewed one of the men responsible for excavating of the vaults; however, she was shocked to learn the audio was unusable thanks to what sounded like voice speaking in Gaelic.

  • The Most Haunted Graveyard In The World Is In Edinburgh on Random Things About Edinburgh's Bloody History

    (#2) The Most Haunted Graveyard In The World Is In Edinburgh

    Edinburgh's Greyfriars Kirkyard is home to half a million souls. And not all of its residents received fancy stone mausoleums. In some areas, the layer of dirt covering the caskets is so thin that bones occasionally poke through. 

    The cemetery's most famous ghost is George MacKenzie. During the 17th century, MacKenzie wreaked havoc on religious non-conformists in Scotland. After his passing, MacKenzie was buried in the Black Mausoleum. When an unsuspecting man opened the tomb in 1999, he reportedly released the MacKenzie Poltergeist, who still allegedly haunts Greyfriars Kirkyard. 

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About This Tool

When people are intoxicated by the beauty and the long cultural history of Edinburgh, they may not remember that Edinburgh had a very dark history and various bloody stories in the past. This city sometimes happens weird haunted events or spooky events, but many people feel that this bloody history makes Edinburgh more attractive. Edinburgh Castle is one of the oldest fortresses in Europe, dating back to the 9th century.

Ancient cities, vicissitudes of castles, melodious bagpipes, etc., so many attractive things in the capital of Scotland, and these characteristic cultures have passed down countless rumors and legends about ghosts. From Edinburgh cemeteries to corpse trading, more about its dark history can be found with the random tool.

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