Random  | Best Random Tools

  • Many Las Vegas Casinos Refused To Work With The Filmmakers on Random Behind-The-Scenes Stories From 'Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas'

    (#11) Many Las Vegas Casinos Refused To Work With The Filmmakers

    Due to the unflattering image the book Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas paints of the infamous city, many casinos and hotels refused to work with the film's producers. That forced director Terry Gilliam to get creative. Once Circus Circus turned Gilliam down, he invented a faux establishment named Bazooka Circus to avoid any legal issues.

    The filmmaker used a 20-foot clown head with an open mouth as the casino's entrance and re-created the actual venue's carousel bar - though in the film, it rotates in the opposite direction.

    A few smaller casinos, like the Binions, the Riviera, and the Palace Hotel, agreed to allow filming, but remained open to the public. The crew could use two lanes of the Palace Hotel's six and had to work around visitors' cars and actual gamblers. Filming occurred between 2 am to 6 am, and the set lights couldn't be bright enough to blind patrons. Gilliam remembered:

    We could control six tables that were close to camera. So we had our extras there and the rest of the scene was the casino running as normal... The strange thing was we couldn't use phony money at the tables; we had to gamble with real money, and the dealers are their dealers! So we had a chance of either losing the budget or doubling the budget.

    Re-creating the Las Vegas of the 1970s also proved to difficult, requiring computer generated imagery as well as footage from the '70s television show Vega$ projected behind the actors.

  • Johnny Depp Won A Russian Acting Award For His Performance on Random Behind-The-Scenes Stories From 'Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas'

    (#8) Johnny Depp Won A Russian Acting Award For His Performance

    Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas flopped at the box office, and critics didn't like it. USA Today said it was "simply unwatchable," and Roger Ebert called it "a horrible mess of a movie." A reviewer at The Washington Post wrote, "Watching it is like being forced to listen to bad heavy metal music turned up to 11 while fat guys in Bermuda shorts compete in a puking contest in the john."

    Director Terry Gilliam knew people had varied responses to his films and wasn't surprised by the reactions, quipping, "The good thing about it was we got a decent number of walkouts - I was worried that we might not, but we did."

    Despite this less-than-stellar response, the film did garner some good press in Russia. The Russian Guild of Film Critics voted Johnny Depp Best Foreign Actor in 1998 for his performance. 

  • The Filmmakers Used Different Techniques For Different Substances on Random Behind-The-Scenes Stories From 'Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas'

    (#2) The Filmmakers Used Different Techniques For Different Substances

    According to director Terry Gilliam, the film recreates the effects of taking various psychoactive substances, "with all the uppers and downers in it. Both the most manic wonderful stuff and the really depressing stuff." To achieve this visual experience, the filmmakers used jump cuts, recorded scenes at odd angles, shot in slow-motion, and employed a wide-angle lens to make scenes uncomfortably disorientating.

    To get the viewer into the characters' heads, director of photography Nicola Pecorini used a different film technique for each substance depicted in the film. Mescaline can create an altered sense of time and make colors seem more intense, so Pecorini shot those scenes with soft lighting and a similar color palette, causing colors to blend into one another. Acid scenes make use of the wide-angle lens, distorting the surroundings and creating a sense of expansion. Sections involving adrenochrome use closeups to imitate claustrophobia and disordered thoughts.

  • Hunter S. Thompson's Real Car And Clothes Appear In The Film on Random Behind-The-Scenes Stories From 'Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas'

    (#4) Hunter S. Thompson's Real Car And Clothes Appear In The Film

    In order to completely absorb Hunter S. Thompson's aura, Johnny Depp dug through the author's closets and found his clothes from 1971. Some of the wardrobe items ended up in the movie, though as Thompson's assistant Deborah Fuller noted, "The clothes hadn't been washed in 30 years."

    Thompson also allowed Depp to drive his red Chevy convertible, the Great Red Shark, from Colorado back to Los Angeles to use in the film. Depp left at 3 am and drove with no shelter from the cold because the convertible's top wouldn't close. Luckily, Thompson packed his pal a cooler full of supplies and loaned him a few flashlights. Depp entertained himself with a portable cassette player and music mentioned in Thompson's book.

  • Oliver Stone And Martin Scorsese Failed To Turn The Book Into A Film on Random Behind-The-Scenes Stories From 'Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas'

    (#13) Oliver Stone And Martin Scorsese Failed To Turn The Book Into A Film

    Rolling Stone published the first part of Hunter S. Thompson's Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas on November 11, 1971 - one year before Thompson turned the piece into a book. Interest from Hollywood soon followed. Jack Nicholson looked into starring, and both Oliver Stone and Martin Scorsese attempted (and failed) to produce the film. One producer allegedly considered John Belushi and Dan Aykroyd for the main roles.

    Director Clive Arrowsmith shared some potential film ideas with Thompson, including how to re-create the moment when reporters become reptiles. Arrowsmith suggested, "It'll be easy - we'll just get live alligators, we'll give them some quaaludes, and we'll nail their f*cking paws to the bar."

    In the interim, Where the Buffalo Roam - an adaptation of several Thompson stories - came out. However, the movie was a critical and box office failure, "because [the subject matter] became uncool," as Thompson put it. For a while, it seemed like Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas might never be made.

  • The Lizard Scene Only Features Eight Animatronics on Random Behind-The-Scenes Stories From 'Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas'

    (#12) The Lizard Scene Only Features Eight Animatronics

    Both camera work and special effects add to the bizarre visuals in Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas. For the memorable scene in which Raoul Duke starts tripping and suddenly finds himself in a bar surrounded by giant lizards, the filmmakers used animatronics instead of computer-generated graphics.

    They ordered 25 lizards, but only received eight. To make the bar seem packed with lizard-people, the crew got creative, dressing the lizards in costumes and changing their clothes between shots so they all looked different. The crew also shot parts of the scene in different areas around the bar to make it look like the lizards were in different spaces. 

New Random Displays    Display All By Ranking

About This Tool

Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas is an adventure movie, released in 1998. The movie tells the story of a sports journalist Duke and his lawyer friends driving to Las Vegas to find their American dream and finally turned into a nightmare full of fear and hatred due to drugs and alcohol. Drugs, loss, and despair, Loneliness, such a theme always attract a large audience.

This is a movie adapted from a news report by Hunter S. Thompson, but to be honest, the plot and logic of the movie are hard to be explained or understood. This page includes random 14 behind the scenes stories of the filming of the movie. Welcome to search for other interesting things with the tool. 

Our data comes from Ranker, If you want to participate in the ranking of items displayed on this page, please click here.

Copyright © 2024 BestRandoms.com All rights reserved.