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Random Facts About How Wrong Jurassic Park Is About Dinosaurs

    Archaeological Digs Are The Same As They Were In 1800: Boring And Slow

    Archaeological Digs Are The Same As They Were In 1800: Boring And Slow

    [ranking: 12]
    If you ever go digging for fossils, expect it to go far differently than what you see in Jurassic Park. Despite what the film depicts, dinosaur skeletons aren't waiting to be unearthed in plain sight. The sonic technology used in Jurassic Park won't help you much, as it's more inaccurate than the film makes out to to be.
    The reality is that digging up fossils today is much like it was back in the 1800s: a bunch of people carefully dig and cross their fingers that they find something. That's it. Not very glamorous. There certainly aren't any hammers and chisels involved in removing incredibly fragile fossils, even if Dr. Alan Grant says there are. 

    Dilophosaurus Exhibited Abilities It Likely Never Possessed

    Dilophosaurus Exhibited Abilities It Likely Never Possessed

    [ranking: 5]
    As exciting as a venom-spitting dinosaur sounds, no one knows if the dilophosaurus actually spit any venom. Being 20 feet long, the dinosaur probably killed prey easily enough without venom. As for the frilly neck that looked like a bizarre version of an Elizabethan collar - again, it grew to be 20 feet long, so it's not like it needed to appear bigger or scarier.
    However, the dilophosaurus did hail from the Jurassic period, so at least the producers nailed that part.

    The T. Rex Could Never Chase You

    The T. Rex Could Never Chase You

    [ranking: 2]
    One new detail in particular makes the T. rex much less terrifying... and makes the Jurassic movies even more ridiculous. According to science, if the T. rex ran as quickly as it does in the movies, it legs would break under its body weight. Not cool, bro, especially since those stubby arms would never break a fall either.
    Scientists with nothing better to do used some fancy computer modeling to discover "that true running gaits would probably lead to unacceptably high skeletal loads in T. rex." So, instead of traipsing around at 45 miles an hour, the T. rex likely ran around a speed of five-to-15 miles per hour. You could have escaped! 

    You Can't Get Dinosaur DNA From A Mosquito

    You Can't Get Dinosaur DNA From A Mosquito

    [ranking: 3]
    The conditions needed for scientists to clone dinosaurs require more than just a piece of amber and Richard Attenborough's sheer willpower. The mosquito would have to be female and consume a ton of blood, only to immediately be encased in tree sap following its feeding. Even if DNA gets perfectly preserved, extracting an uncompromised DNA sample stands as a nearly impossible task. Furthermore, the insects used in the film arose well after the dinosaurs become extinct. 
    In 2017, scientists came somewhat close to a real-life Jurassic Park experience when they found a tick preserved in amber - along with a feather. Though this sounds like the beginnings of a possible theme park, the reality is far from it. Scientists can't even tell what kind of dinosaur the tick fed on, only that it was a dinosaur because the amber dates to the mid-Cretaceous period. Unfortunately for your dreams but fortunately for humanity's safety, the tick failed to produce the DNA needed to clone a real dinosaur.

    The Proper Amber Would Not Turn Up In The Dominican Republic

    The Proper Amber Would Not Turn Up In The Dominican Republic

    [ranking: 11]
    The Dominican Republic does produce amber fossils, but not the kind necessary to clone dinosaurs from it (usually). However, after the release of the first Jurassic Park movie, sales of amber from the Dominican Republican increased by a whopping 500%. This prompted a healthy counterfeit market that the country, particularly for pieces that have preserved insects. Nearly all of the amber dates from 15 million years at the young side to 40 million years on the old side. Considering that dinosaurs roamed Earth around 65-230 million years ago, it's pretty unlikely any of the amber would have dinosaur DNA. 
    The oldest insect found preserved in amber in the DR - a spider - dates back to about 130 million years ago, earning it a spot in the Guinness Book of World Records. However, this is clearly the exception, not the rule. 

    All The Dinos Are Missing A Key Feature: Feathers

    All The Dinos Are Missing A Key Feature: Feathers

    [ranking: 6]
    A noticeable problem in all of the Jurassic movies would be that none of the dinosaurs are shown with feathers. Recent evidence excavated in Siberia suggests all dinosaurs, not just some, sported feathers. A two-legged dinosaur fossil dating back to 160 million years ago in the Jurassic period indicates that feathers existed in more than just avian-like/winged dinosaurs; it's more likely that feathers existed much longer than previously thought. The fossils turned up in what used to be a lake bed; ash from volcanic eruptions preserved their skeletons as well as their feathers.
    To be fair, the Siberian fossil turned up two decades after the first film, so this gaffe can slide a little bit.

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Another day, another lie from Hollywood. Inaccuracies in the Jurassic Park movies abound, and the biggest scientific errors glare at you with the intensity of a T.rex staring down two kids trapped in a car. As crazy as it sounds, Steven Spielberg never tackled the film with the intent a National Geographic-worthy film. From the original movies and pre-glam Laura Dern to Bryce Dallas Howard running from a dinosaur in heels (seriously, when will women in movies wear reasonable shoes?), the popular film saga takes plenty of artistic liberties when it comes to even the simplest dinosaur facts. The biggest scientific errors in Jurassic Park sound surprising, until you recall most sci-fi movies employ bad science.

The Jurassic Park series plays the same game, adding traits to dinosaurs that range from bada** (venom spitting) to bizarre (sneezing). But inaccuracies in these films include more than just what Jurassic Park gets wrong about dinosaurs; their "rules" on fossils and genetics unravel faster than strands of DNA encased in amber (yep, even the insects lied in this film). But don't let the Jurassic Park movies's sci-fi lies get you down. The world will always have Chris Pratt's abs... unless those were CGI, too.

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