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  • The Crew Spent Nights Finding Low-Fi Ways To Scare The Actors on Random Wild Details Cast And Crew Has Revealed About Making 'Blair Witch Project'

    (#7) The Crew Spent Nights Finding Low-Fi Ways To Scare The Actors

    Free of the big budget of Hollywood blockbusters, the crew had to think outside the box to create scares for the actors to encounter. Not only did filmmakers control how much information about the Blair Witch each cast member possessed, they also allowed them to believe the legend was real and not created for the film. Actual townspeople included plants meant to lead the cast to different conclusions or provide further detail about the mythology to create a sense of reality about it.

    As Donahue, Leonard, and Williams filmed, the crew stayed out of sight. During the night, the crew dressed in dark colors or camouflage clothing in order to snap branches in the woods, slam their hands on tent walls, or make creepy noises to antagonize the cast. Not every scare worked as it was supposed to, according to Myrick:

    We had this whole plan of having this guy - this creepy moment where there might have been an analysis where if someone looks closely there'd be a little glow-y, white humanoid figure in the woods somewhere. We had a friend of ours dress up in white long johns and be parked off in the woods just between the trees, and our hope was that as the camera was running, it would catch a little glimpse of this guy. That was what Heather was reacting to [when running through the woods], saying "What the f*ck is that?" but we never got it to read on camera. I felt bad for the guy, because it was pretty cold that night and he fell into the water. We had to take our clothes off to get to him. A lot of work for no end result, except for, "What the f*ck is that?"

  • Donahue's Famous Monologue Was Improvised And She Shot It Alone on Random Wild Details Cast And Crew Has Revealed About Making 'Blair Witch Project'

    (#10) Donahue's Famous Monologue Was Improvised And She Shot It Alone

    The "I'm sorry" monologue performed by Donahue near the end of the movie became famous and much-parodied after the film's success. She received instructions for the scene in a note that told her she needed to apologize for causing all of the movie's events while keeping Williams unaware of her filming and its content. Donahue took the camera into a secluded spot in the woods and filmed the entire scene alone. She thought the camera was zoomed out to capture her entire face for the performance, learning only later that it was up-close and snot-filled.

    According to Sánchez:

    We told Heather, "You don't want to freak out Mike obviously, so take the camera and find an area near the tent and basically say goodbye to everybody you know. You're gonna die." We were feeding them ideas where they went as far as their character. At that point, Heather pretty much knew she was going to die, and then she went out and delivered this crazy, brilliant performance. It was one of those moments, as filmmakers, we hadn't seen her shoot that because we basically left her alone, but when we saw that we were like, "Wow, this could be really powerful."

  • The Ending Was One Of The 'Most Traditional' Parts Of The Production on Random Wild Details Cast And Crew Has Revealed About Making 'Blair Witch Project'

    (#11) The Ending Was One Of The 'Most Traditional' Parts Of The Production

    Perhaps surprisingly, filmmakers allotted two days to film the final scene and used several takes to get it right. Prior to filming, Sánchez recorded Leonard yelling for help and then used a boombox to prompt Williams to run into the woods looking for his lost friend. The moment where Donahue and Williams emerge from the woods to see a dilapidated house was real, as they had no idea where the movie's denouement took place.

    Myrick recalled:

    For example, the final scene with the house, it looks like it's all one take. Heather's shrieking in the house, and it looks like she's losing her mind, but we shot that over multiple takes and over two days—that was one of the most traditional segments of the movie. We had to really set and reset and be careful walking through that house so that nobody got hurt. It was much more orchestrated.

  • The Crew Left Less Food For The Actors Over The Course Of The Shoot  on Random Wild Details Cast And Crew Has Revealed About Making 'Blair Witch Project'

    (#8) The Crew Left Less Food For The Actors Over The Course Of The Shoot

    The filmmakers promised the cast their safety, but not their comfort through the shoot. A part of that included a lack of food commensurate to that of the fictional college students they portrayed. Making sure never to starve the cast, Williams remembered the rations:

    Let's say the first day was a sandwich and a bag of chips for lunch, and the second day was maybe just the sandwich, the third day was maybe just the bag of chips, the fourth day maybe we didn't have a lunch. By the last couple of days, there was enough to sustain, but not a lot of food. So they decreased the amount of food we were eating, which we knew was going to happen, but it wasn't like... It wasn't like we didn't eat for days. Our safety was never at risk. The whole idea was to have us as uncomfortable as possible without putting us in danger.

  • The Actors Received A Crash Course In Recording Sound And Video on Random Wild Details Cast And Crew Has Revealed About Making 'Blair Witch Project'

    (#15) The Actors Received A Crash Course In Recording Sound And Video

    Only Leonard had previous experience with filming, but none with the specific CP-16 camera his character uses in the film. Each actor received a quick rundown of how to operate the CP-16 and Hi8 cameras used to make the movie. Williams served as the sound guy for the movie both as a character and in reality, learning to plug in the right cords and use DAT on the fly. This led to mistakes, some of which remain in the movies, as Leonard recalled:

    I’d never shot with the CP-16 before. It was a beast of a camera - mostly used for news broadcasts before video was invented. When I arrived in Maryland, I was introduced to the late and great Neal Fredericks, who was in charge of the film’s "look." He and I went out shooting for a day so I could learn the ins and outs of the CP. But even that didn’t save me from screwing up a bunch of the footage - that whole conversation in the movie about feet versus meters after we left Mary Brown’s house - that was real. That was me realizing that I’d screwed up the calculations for my measurements and the footage was probably going to be out of focus.

  • Filming Lasted 24 Hours A Day For Eight Days Straight on Random Wild Details Cast And Crew Has Revealed About Making 'Blair Witch Project'

    (#13) Filming Lasted 24 Hours A Day For Eight Days Straight

    Donahue, Leonard, and Williams really filmed and recorded audio for the entire film, explaining the shaky movements and sometimes poor sound quality of the finished product. This created an atmosphere where the cameras and the actors had to be on 24 hours a day throughout the eight-day shoot. 

    Myrick explained:

    We just led them around on a 24-hour-a-day stage play, really. We set up all the set pieces before hand, and they would just follow our directions...We shook their tent, we played sounds of little kids playing outside their tent, we made noises in the middle of the night, we led them to this crazy house at the end—we basically just played the Blair Witch.

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The Blair Witch Project is a supernatural horror film, released in 1999. The film innovated the form of a pseudo-documentary horror film. It tells the story of 3 film students who went to a small town to investigate local legends about witches and prepared to make them into a documentary, but they disappeared strangely soon. Many people think that film is based on a real story. The town of Burkittsville in the film is real, and many of the scenes are the real reactions of actors after being frightened.

The production of every movie is not simple, there is something that did happen when filming the Blair Witch Project, let us check the wild details the cast and crew have revealed, the random tool displays 15 entries.

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