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Random Times 'Monty Python and Holy Grail' Was Surprisingly Historically Accurate

  • Coconuts Were Not, In Fact, Native To Britain on Random Times 'Monty Python and Holy Grail' Was Surprisingly Historically Accurate

    (#12) Coconuts Were Not, In Fact, Native To Britain

    Though considered a tropical fruit and grown with gusto in Central America, the Caribbean, and Hawaii, coconuts are native to the Pacific Basin and Indian Ocean Basin. They were spread through trade, but as King Arthur is told, they definitely did not grow in England - nor were they ever bandied about by industrious swallows.

    Medieval Europeans did not ever refer to them as coconuts, but rather the “Nut of India.”

  • Medieval Clergy Really Emphasized The Number Three on Random Times 'Monty Python and Holy Grail' Was Surprisingly Historically Accurate

    (#9) Medieval Clergy Really Emphasized The Number Three

    Due to a deeply held, superstitious belief in numerology during Medieval times, the number three was considered incredibly important. It was thought to be holy, as it signified the Holy Trinity. The learned clergy, in particular, took number symbolism very seriously and applied it to everything from scripture to architecture.

    On a wider scale, the words “all” and “many” were used instead of the number three. The terms “beginning, middle, and end” were a set of three that encompassed everything. Much “counting” of the time consisted of simply “one, two, many.” No wonder King Arthur bungled the number three in the Holy Hand Grenade scene.

  • Medieval Clergy Needed Very Little Evidence To Convict A Witch on Random Times 'Monty Python and Holy Grail' Was Surprisingly Historically Accurate

    (#1) Medieval Clergy Needed Very Little Evidence To Convict A Witch

    In Holy Grail, we see a young woman accused of witchcraft by an angry mob. The mob is eager to burn the "witch," but Sir Bedevere stops them from going through with it - at least until they can prove she weighs as much as a duck. If her weight is equal to the duck, he claims, then she is probably made of wood and therefore a witch. That's why witches burn, after all.

    The questions Bedevere poses to the mob, and his test for determining witchcraft, are utterly absurd to a modern audience, but they do hold a sliver of historical accuracy. Nonconformists, or anyone considered an outsider, were deemed by the medieval Catholic Church to be a public danger. Simply deviating from the norm was sensationalized and criminalized. Clerics preached of the eminent threat these groups presented and insisted that their nonconformity was the work of the devil.

    Even women who could not conceive and people born with medical abnormalities were attributed to Satan, as evil resided in both the moral and physical realms. Jews who practiced openly, those accused of homosexual behavior, and, of course, those who were said to practice sorcery were considered offenders deserving of execution. Many accused witches were antagonized until they confessed, then most often hanged or burned.

  • Grave Diggers Collected Cadavers En Masse During The Black Plague on Random Times 'Monty Python and Holy Grail' Was Surprisingly Historically Accurate

    (#4) Grave Diggers Collected Cadavers En Masse During The Black Plague

    When the Bubonic Plague, or Black Death, raged in Europe, it struck down so many people that grave diggers really did go through towns collecting the deceased. The highly contagious plague is estimated to have wiped out one-third to one-half of the European population during the late Middle Ages.

    While individual burials were standard prior to the outbreak, most traditional funerary practices were suspended due to the extraordinarily high number of casualties. Mass graves became the only way to keep up, and cadavers were often piled five-deep in long trenches.

    Fear of contamination led family members to expel their deceased loved ones from their homes as soon as possible. Men of low social standing, known as the Becchini, were tasked with lugging carts through the streets to collect discarded citizens and lug them away. Sometimes the sick would even be piled onto carts alongside the deceased, as their demise was an inevitability. So there is, in fact, some dark truth to the “I’m not dead yet” bit in the film.

  • Peasant Life Was Dingy, But They Did Have Plenty Of Free Time on Random Times 'Monty Python and Holy Grail' Was Surprisingly Historically Accurate

    (#6) Peasant Life Was Dingy, But They Did Have Plenty Of Free Time

    Peasants of medieval times were filthy and constantly endangered by disease, starvation, and the skirmishes of the upper classes. In Holy Grail, peasants are able to identify the king because he doesn’t have “sh*t all over him.”

    When peasants worked, it was hard and unforgiving, but they also had two to six months of “vacation time” each year, as well as time off for holidays and all manner of special events. This may explain the peasants of the film engaging in absolutely ridiculous activities to pass the time, such as bludgeoning streams and repeatedly hurling a cat into a wall.

  • Knights Each Had Their Own Unique Heraldry on Random Times 'Monty Python and Holy Grail' Was Surprisingly Historically Accurate

    (#8) Knights Each Had Their Own Unique Heraldry

    The signs emblazoned on a knight’s belongings proclaimed their achievements and pedigree, and were unique to each knight. This “coat of arms” was most often displayed on a knight’s shield. Normally, a knight’s heraldry would be ceremoniously bestowed upon them to be displayed as a badge of honor.

    The practice dates back to ancient times, when such heraldry indicated people, families, or groups of peoples. The Lion of Judah was an example of ancient Hebrew heraldry, and ancient Romans sported the Eagle of the Caesars. The totems of Native Americans are another example of the practice.

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Monty Python and the Holy Grail is an old British comedy film, the film was released in 1975. The film is based on the legend of King Arthur in the Medieval, telling the story of King Arthur and the Round Table Warriors accepting the will of God to find the legend of the Holy Grail. The exquisite scenes and props that fit the historical description have won unanimous praise from critics and audiences.

The random tool has generated 12 items, including 122 times Monty Python and the Holy Grail that are surprisingly historically accurate. You can find more information about this movie. Welcome to check this interesting collection.  

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