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Random Inaccuracy In 'A Christmas Story’s Version Of '40s

  • Scut Farkus's Davy Crockett Hat Wasn't Popular Until The '50s on Random Inaccuracy In 'A Christmas Story’s Version Of '40s

    (#1) Scut Farkus's Davy Crockett Hat Wasn't Popular Until The '50s

    Davy Crockett's famous coonskin cap makes several appearances in the movie. It's first worn by Ralphie's father during a fantasy sequence in which Ralphie saves his frontier-era family from bad guys with his Red Ryder gun; its second appearance is atop the head of bully Scut Farkus. For a movie made in the 1980s, the hat symbolized boyhood from a bygone era and seemed an apt costuming detail. In 1940, however, someone wearing a faux raccoon pelt on their head would have been unusual.

    Davy Crockett was a real frontiersman and folk hero who lived during the late 1700s and early 1800s, but his famous hat - made out of a raccoon with an intact tail - didn't enter pop culture until the mid-1950s. Walt Disney was behind the trend thanks to a five-part television series about Crockett, which gave hundreds of young boys a sudden desire to dress like the hero. The hat mania continued into 1955 as Disney assembled the series into a feature movie called Davy Crockett, King of the Wild Frontier. The hats were so popular, the National Museum of American History claimed people purchased around 5,000 hats a day during the 1950s.

  • Mrs. Parker's Permed Hairdo Is From The 1980s on Random Inaccuracy In 'A Christmas Story’s Version Of '40s

    (#4) Mrs. Parker's Permed Hairdo Is From The 1980s

    As a loving mother to two young boys and wife to a man whose idea of good taste includes fishnet-clad leg lamps, Mrs. Parker spends much of the film just as frazzled as her hair. In the late 1930s or early 1940s, however, her hair style would have looked entirely out of place. A period appropriate woman's hair style would have not featured bangs, and would have been carefully styled with every hair in place.

    Although curls were in, they were not the tight curls Mrs. Parker wears. They were rolled curls that were soft and sleek like those worn by Ralphie's teacher, Miss Shields. Most women at the time also wore their hair short and pinned back away from the face. Mrs. Parker's look is more appropriate for the 1980s, when the movie was made, as big hair was in and kinky permanent waves were all the rage.

  • Mr. Parker’s 1938 Oldsmobile Uses Bolts - Not Nuts, As He Implies on Random Inaccuracy In 'A Christmas Story’s Version Of '40s

    (#11) Mr. Parker’s 1938 Oldsmobile Uses Bolts - Not Nuts, As He Implies

    As Ralphie and his family drive home after buying a Christmas tree, their car gets a flat tire. Mr. Parker gets out to swap the flat with the spare while Mrs. Parker suggests Ralphie help his father. There's a brief moment of bonding over this manly task, and Mr. Parker hands Ralphie the hubcap, telling him to hold it horizontally like a bowl so he can "put the nuts in it." As he does this, viewers can clearly see Ralphie holding four lug nuts inside the hubcap. Unfortunately, Mr. Parker almost immediately knocks the hubcap out of Ralphie's hand, causing the contents to go flying and Ralphie to drop his infamous F-bomb - subsequent punishment for which will be a mouth full of soap.

    A historical anachronism was revealed once viewers identified Mr. Parker's car as a 1938 Oldsmobile - which, contrary to what the old man said, used wheel bolts instead of lug nuts. Used by many older cars and German models for wheel attachment, wheel bolts feature a long threaded part that passes through the wheel and brake rotor hat. Lug nuts, on the other hand, are short and screw onto studs mounted in the hub.

    Although this may be a minor inaccuracy, the error becomes more obvious as Ralphie watches the hubcap and nuts flying out of his hands and the narrator describes the moment as if immortalized in his memory: "For one brief moment, I saw all the bolts silhouetted against the lights of the traffic, and then they were gone."

  • The Radio Flyer Wagons Displayed In The Higbee's Window Are From The 1970s on Random Inaccuracy In 'A Christmas Story’s Version Of '40s

    (#9) The Radio Flyer Wagons Displayed In The Higbee's Window Are From The 1970s

    The movie opens as a crowd gathers around the holiday window displays of Higbee's department store to marvel at the selection of toys. In addition to Ralphie's coveted Red Ryder, the display includes working train sets, wood sleds, and several Radio Flyer wagons.

    Radio Steel & Manufacturing introduced its first steel Radio Flyer wagon in 1930, so the classic toy would have been an era-appropriate toy for Ralphie and his friends. The specific models that appear in the movie, however, were manufactured during the 1970s. Radio Flyer wagons from the 1940s featured different branding on the side, with a classic-looking typeface and silver colored caps on the wheels. The 1970s models, like those seen in the movie, featured red caps on the wheels and more modern lettering.

    Not only are the wagons out of place, but the Raggedy Ann and Andy dolls appear to be more modern versions as well. Raggedy Ann has been around since 1915, but the ones included in the film appear to be those made by the Knickerbocker Toy Co., which manufactured the dolls between 1963 and 1982.

  • Mr. Parker Receives A Blue Bowling Ball For Christmas, But Bowling Balls Didn’t Have Color Until The '60s  on Random Inaccuracy In 'A Christmas Story’s Version Of '40s

    (#8) Mr. Parker Receives A Blue Bowling Ball For Christmas, But Bowling Balls Didn’t Have Color Until The '60s

    As the Parkers wrap up their gift-giving on Christmas morning, Mrs. Parker drops a round, wrapped object in her husband's lap. "From me to you," she says. He replies "Thanks a lot," in a high pitched voice, indicating the object is heavy enough to hurt his groin. Mr. Parker opens the package to find a bright blue bowling ball and exclaims, "Well... it's a blue ball!"

    Cleverly deployed adult jokes aside, this gift would not have been possible back in 1939. After using wood for many years, rubber became the material of choice for bowling ball manufacturing until the 1950s. Up to the 1960s, when polyester resin became more popular than rubber, bowling balls were the color of their materials - typically black or brown. By changing to polyester, however, manufacturers were able to create bowling balls in a variety of colors and patterns, just like Mr. Parker's historically inaccurate gift.

  • Ralphie’s Glasses Were Not Invented Until The '80s  on Random Inaccuracy In 'A Christmas Story’s Version Of '40s

    (#7) Ralphie’s Glasses Were Not Invented Until The '80s

    Ralphie's round frames are a signature part of his bespectacled look. After being repeatedly told he'll shoot his eye out with the Red Ryder BB gun he covets so desperately, his glasses are knocked off his head after firing his dream Christmas present for the first time. Unable to see, Ralphie accidentally destroys his glasses, taking one wrong step and crunching them under his winter boots. He lies to his parents about how they broke and escapes punishment.

    While people in 1939 had access to a variety of eyeglasses, the style of hinge that appears on Ralphie's glasses was invented in the 1980s. A shot of Ralphie's broken glasses lying in the snow shows the frames have a three-barrel hinge with a screw - the type of hinge that operates like door hinges. According to one optician, the frames appear to be Liberty Legend frames, which were popular at the time the movie was filmed.

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A Christmas Story is a family comedy film directed by Bob Clark. It was released on the Christmas holiday in 1983 and was adapted from a semi-fiction anecdote published by Jean Shepherd in 1966, and some of the stories in the movie come from his book published in 1971. The movie tells the boy's perseverance and adult's absurd behavior, the audience will laugh in mild humor and pungent irony.

The random tool lists 14 inaccuracies in A Christmas Story that was a popular movie, although the era of the movie has never been explicitly mentioned, people infer that the movie set up in the 1940s based on many details and features in the movie.

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