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Random Foods For Nuclear Families In Postwar Era United States

  • Meatloaf Was The Quintessential American Dish on Random Foods For Nuclear Families In Postwar Era United States

    (#1) Meatloaf Was The Quintessential American Dish

    Although the dish dates back to 5th-century Europe, meatloaf was introduced to the US as a breakfast food in the 1870s. It took another two decades to gain a foothold in American cuisine as industrial-scale meatpacking became more commonplace. During the Depression and WWII, the meal allowed American families to make the most of whatever meat they had by mixing in breadcrumbs or cereal and eggs. 

    After WWII, meatloaf exploded as a family favorite across the country, so much so that there were 70 different recipes for the dish in Doyne Nickerson's book 365 Ways to Cook Hamburger. American moms everywhere made meatloaf to stretch the family food budget, and families enjoyed the hearty, ketchup-covered dish. Today, some restaurants feature meatloaf as a nostalgia trip for those who miss this long-established comfort food. 

  • 1950s Homemakers Thought Aspic Made Them Look Affluent on Random Foods For Nuclear Families In Postwar Era United States

    (#12) 1950s Homemakers Thought Aspic Made Them Look Affluent

    If you've seen any vintage cookbooks, you've likely seen pictures of meals encased in gelatin and aspic. Aspic is made with meat stock and has a savory taste. When gelatinized, it can hold various pieces of meat and vegetables. In the 1950s, aspic dishes were often molded into impressive shapes. 

    Aspic and gelatin dishes were hugely popular in the 1950s due to the introduction of refrigeration in US homes. At the beginning of the decade, few families could afford refrigerators, so any dishes made with gelatin were considered status symbols as they needed to be chilled to set correctly. 

    Despite their associations with affluence, however, the dishes themselves were cheap to make and easy to prepare. One such recipe, the Perfection Salad, consisted of a lemon Jell-O and vinegar base with cabbage, celery, carrots, peppers, and pimientos. 

  • Chop Suey Was An Easy Way To Introduce Families To Chinese Cuisine  on Random Foods For Nuclear Families In Postwar Era United States

    (#10) Chop Suey Was An Easy Way To Introduce Families To Chinese Cuisine

    Post-WWII America saw an increase in the popularity of ethnic cuisines. Chop suey or "shap sui" roughly translates as "odds and ends." This Chinese dish is said to have gotten its start in San Francisco during the Gold Rush. It was popular in American homes and restaurants by the 1920s, but it really took off in the 1950s as a cheap, filling, and easy family meal. 

    Chop suey - made with meat, noodles, bean sprouts, water chestnuts, bamboo shoots, onions, and celery - fell out of favor by the 1970s as more authentic Chinese dishes grew in popularity. 

  • Thumb of Wonder Bread Was The Consumer's Bread Of Choice In The 1950s video

    (#8) Wonder Bread Was The Consumer's Bread Of Choice In The 1950s

    The Taggart Baking Company marketed Wonder Bread as an economical and nutritious product starting in 1921. In the 1950s, this bleached, sugar-laden, 1.5-pound loaf was the first pre-sliced bread on store shelves. It was hugely popular with consumers. During the 1950s and '60s, the average American consumed a loaf per week and got almost 30 percent of their daily caloric intake from it. 

    In the '80s, Wonder Bread's reign in the American kitchen was challenged as consumers turned to more artisanal breads. Wonder Bread is still on store shelves but isn't nearly as popular as wheat bread, which has since become the American bread of choice.

     

  • Flaky Baked Goods Were Created With Crisco on Random Foods For Nuclear Families In Postwar Era United States

    (#3) Flaky Baked Goods Were Created With Crisco

    Crisco shortening was in every pantry in the 1950s. Proctor and Gamble introduced it in 1911 as a healthy alternative to lard. It was made from partially hydrogenated cottonseed oil, which made pastries flakier and fried foods crispier. 

    During the middle of the 20th century, Crisco became increasingly popular as an alternative to other fats. By around 1950, health advocates began warning of the dangers of saturated fats; concerned for their health, many families switched to Crisco. This trend, however, reversed in the 1990s when studies showed that trans fats were actually worse for you. Crisco is still on store shelves today, but has a different formula than it did in the 1950s. 

     

  • Spam Cemented Its Status As An American Staple With The 'Hormel Girls'    on Random Foods For Nuclear Families In Postwar Era United States

    (#7) Spam Cemented Its Status As An American Staple With The 'Hormel Girls'   

    Spam, which takes its name from "spiced ham," hit store shelves in 1937 and was an instant hit with consumers. Made with pork shoulder, ham, salt, water, sugar, and sodium nitrite, the Hormel Foods creation was meat that didn't need refrigeration. 

    Hormel's marketing resonated with consumers as much as the product did and featured some of the earliest "interactive" campaigns, including a contest to name the product and submit to a Spam recipe book. Spam was also easy for American forces to eat on the front lines, and they introduced it to new countries as they traveled. 

    After WWII, Spam came back to American dinner tables and was even more popular than before. A musical group of female WWII vets called the Hormel Girls touted the product during peacetime with their hit radio show. During those years, Spam sales went through the roof. Hormel has since sold over 8 billion cans of Spam in 44 counties. 

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About This Tool

At the end of World War II, it seemed to be the end of a long and dark night. As a victorious country, the United States has obtained huge development opportunities, and its food culture has also changed a lot. The types of food increased during World War II, especially nuclear families enjoyed many delicious and superior foods at that time.

The eating habits in the Postwar era have changed, and almost no one wants to spend a whole day in the kitchen. In grocery stores, ready-made and frozen foods are all the rage. The pursuit of a relaxing life has become a popular thing. It is a great time to know more about the foods in the Postwar era with the random tool.

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